Tag Archives: repurposing

Nerfpunk: Costuming with a (Comical) Mission

Nerfpunks

Everyone has their own flavor of punk. Steampunk. Dieselpunk. Clockpunk. Atompunk. Even bustlepunk. Now, meet Nerfpunk. The brainchild of Austin and Megan Maude Sirkin, Nerfpunk is a tongue-in-cheek attempt to reverse the common trend of steampunking Nerf weapons, which Austin calls the unofficial mascot of steampunk. Instead of repainting brightly colored Nerf weapons in blacks, browns and grays, Nerfpunks create their steampunk attire in the bright colors of Nerf weapons. It’s certainly not meant to be an independent movement, nor

Loki Jacket, Part 3: Sleeves and Shoulders

Jacket with finished shoulder pieces and sleeve inserts

This is a continuation of posts relating to my current steampunk costuming project Steampunk Loki Jacket Part Two: Color, Fabric, and Trim Holding Costumes Together: Sewing, Fabric Glue, and Hot Glue I have a love-hate relationship with the sleeves and shoulders.  The most successful part of whole coat was the sleeves, which is good because they were a pain in the ass to do. Perhaps the least successful part was the shoulders, which were necessary because of the sleeves. Cutting

Loki Jacket, Part 2: Color, Fabric, and Trim

Sample colors swatches in green and gold, microsuede and man-made silk.

This continues from Costuming Project: Steampunk Loki Jacket, where I outlined the first steps in finding a suitable base coat and did some basic shaping. Now it’s time to create more intricate decoration and add some color to the project. Fabric Color Loki’s movie jacket is black and overly brilliant green with gold embellishments. These are the colors of a comic book character.  While I damn near always go for ostentatious in my steampunk costuming, often bordering on absurd, those

Recycling Old Items; or, When Were These Ever in Fashion?

I’m in the middle of a major steampunk costuming project which incorporates black, olive green and gold.  Today I decided I was going to construct some jewelry to go along with it. My steampunk jewelry tends to be large and ostentatious.  Actually, most of my steampunk wardrobe is based on that principle.  I like to say an outfit is finished when I’ve added one too many items.  Alternatively, double whatever I’ve done at the point my husband warns I’ve gone